Entertainment is about one thing. Money. Oh, sure. It’s about art and drama and comedy and evoking emotion and love and war and peace and sex and glamor.  But it’s about money.

The root of making money with entertainment is advertising. Now, this can come in a million different ways. You can sell advertising. You can write clever commercials for your podcast. You can do something with product placement. You can put patches on your clothes, hell, you can even buy advertising to wear.

Television, Movies and Radio all treat advertising as a necessary evil. It gets even more complicated when it comes to news outlets.  But we, the consumer, have a pretty high threshold of advertising.

We watch SportsCenter interview an athlete in front of a banner for a deodorant and don’t even raise an eyebrow anymore. Joe Buck does Budweiser commercials in the middle of his telecast and nobody flinches.

There have been examples where advertising has affected the “sanctity” of a broadcast.  I remember when the Spiderman 2 movie wanted to advertise on the bases of an MLB game and there was much outrage.

Yet, NASCAR drivers look like quilts with all of their patches and sponsorships and name-dropping during interviews and nobody cares.

It’s a slippery slope.

So, yesterday when Sports Radio 810 tweeted out a clearly sponsored or purchased tweet about KFC Chicken Nuggets, I was kind of surprised that it was met with such venom (myself included.)

We know 810 has always valued the almighty dollar and has offered up air-time for sponsorship agreements. (Full disclosure: Our radio show, The Kansas City Baseball Vault is on ESPN 1510 because of one of those agreements. For my sake, I can’t tell you what I’d do if someone offered me a wad of cash to tweet something word for word. Everybody has a price, and mine is shockingly low.)

But blatantly selling yourself out… for chicken nuggets? Have you no shame?

What do you say? Was this over the line? Do you know where the line is? IS there a line?